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The building type of 'military architecture' is an interesting indicator as a changing cultural understanding in the act of aggression by human beings. In the early days mankind hunted for food but also needed protection, which led to the inhabitation of the cave. As civilization progressed, more aggression was directed against other human beings, which shaped social and architectural configurations, as most cities in the world are master planned driven by this phenomenon. Proportional to their relevance in human behavior, the architecture of “protection and offense” achieved a privileged status and priority.

 

The building design was developed in a trial-and-error manner out of a sequence of volumetric studies, all having in common the creation of a sense of place in the no man’s land. The first, being courtyard shaped, form with the next having masses sloping out of the ground responding to the only existing reference as burmed bunkers under the wide horizon, broken up by sloping forest lines.
These versions were denied by the client authorities because they thought of them as too free spiritedly interpreting the program. In this way they helped to distillate the quintessence of the project.

 

Monolithic stony masses arise with low sloped roofs from the ground to the surroundings. Deep cut voids define the entrance and focus relationships to the outside world, like the panorama framing slit window in the dining hall and the vertical window of the entry and kiosk zone.

 

In regard of the monolithic tectonic concept, the building material is aerated concreted, which provides sustainability throughout robustness and good indoor quality by thermal mass. The monochromatic notion of the grey colored stucco and the folded zinc roof camouflages the volume while windows and roofs are set flush to the outside walls.

The intersection of the volumes in the central hinge of the dining hall creates an interior character which physically enhances a culinary aspect within the act of eating. Achieved by simple means of volume and spatial arrangement, the self-contained exterior appearance intentionally contrasts an interior characterized by the differentiated broadcasting of light in a sense of the “slice of sun that your building has,” as Louis Kahn quotes the great American poet Wallace Stevens.

warbelow military diner